Essential Reads

Interpersonal Attraction

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 24, 2017 in A Sideways View
What has evolutionary science to say about physical attractiveness?

Want to Build a Dog From A Fox? Here's How To Do It.

Tucked away in Siberia, there are furry, four-legged creatures with wagging tails that are as friendly as any lapdog. But, despite appearances, these are not dogs—they are foxes.
Richard McDowell/Shutterstock

Self-Deception Helps Us Accomplish Goals

By Tim Cole Ph.D. on March 20, 2017 in Intimate Portrait
More often than not, we lead with our goals and desires, not the facts. New research on how our ability to delude ourselves can be quite useful.

Moral Incentives for Dummies

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on March 14, 2017 in Ambigamy
What is basic morality and what incentive system does best to promote it?

More Posts on Evolutionary Psychology

Why Do Dogs React to Cats?

Is it the sight of the cat, the sound of a cat, or the smell of a cat that excites dogs the most? The answer might surprise you.
Hydra: Wikipedia commons

Why Do We Die?

By Thomas Hills Ph.D. on March 18, 2017 in Statistical Life
Our survivability is the bargaining chip that life pays to keep us immortal.

Two-Legged Walking and Human Skull Traits Evolved in Tandem

Our hominid ancestors' ability to walk upright on two legs evolved in tandem with distinctive traits of the human skull, according to a new follow-up study.

The Better Angels of Our Nature

By Hank Davis on March 14, 2017 in Caveman Logic
It sometimes seems impossible to find those "better angels" inside ourselves and resist the lure of of meanness and bigotry that's all around us.
By Tkgd2007 - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Human_evolution.svg?uselang=en-gb, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=53150354

Evolutionary Psychology Applies to Everyone

Can understanding our evolutionary history help us better function in the contemporary environment? Absolutely!

On Criminology and Politics in the Social Sciences

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on March 09, 2017 in More Than Mortal
A biosocial criminologist's thoughts on the state of his field, professional challenges, and ideological bias within the social sciences.

Can Modern People Survive in the Wild?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 09, 2017 in The Human Beast
The history of European explorers contains nasty stories of intelligent people failing to adapt to harsh new environments. One exception may be Viking colony in Greenland.

Getting Things Done, Procrastinating or Not

Procrastination should not be linked with failure, just as early action should not be tied to success.

Do Dogs Ever Lie to or Try to Deceive People?

New data shows that dogs are capable of being deceptive around people when it is in their own self-interest.

Why Carl Sagan's 1995 Prediction Seems So Prescient

Did the uncanny astronomer see into our future, or did our own wishful thinking make his decades-old quote go viral?

Why Women Want to Lose Weight

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 02, 2017 in The Human Beast
In subsistence societies, heavier women are perceived as fertile and sexually attractive. In developed countries, women strive to be more slender. Why?

It’s the Mode For Men to Have More Sex Partners

A common fallacy mistakes the mean for the mode where numbers of sex partners distinguished by sex is concerned.
"Intelligent Mud Counts" by author

Intelligent Mud

Emotions make our mud human—sometimes intelligently caring, often charming, on occasion—lovable.

Are We All Haters?

"All my friends in New York define themselves by what they hate,” says Lena Dunham’s character, Hannah Horvath, on Girls.

Why do People Lie? Part Two.

By Joseph A. Shrand M.D. on February 25, 2017 in The I-M Approach
Who is lying? Who is telling the truth? Strategic lying is all around us. So we form groups with people who share our values and we can trust. We are desperate to trust.

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

Sapiens provides insights into human behavior by tracing the history of our species from its emergence amidst other pre-humans through its journey to the present day.

The Biggest Psychological Mystery We Ignore

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on February 23, 2017 in Ambigamy
All of the biggest philosophical, theological, biological, psychological and sociological questions boiled down to one that most of us haven't heard nor thought about.

Greed Is Good?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on February 22, 2017 in The Human Beast
Greed is good! Sharing is for Communists and losers! Do such maxims capture the essence of human social behavior?

Trivia Quiz: How Well Do You Know Psychology’s Pioneers?

When he delivered his now classic book to his publisher, which author apologized that it was a "loathsome, distended, tumefied, bloated, dropsical mass?"

Creative Thinking is no Longer an Option, It's Essential

The future belongs to creative thinkers. The real currency of our time isn't money, it's ideas. You need to become an ideas generator whatever field you work in.

Deep Memories of Insects

By Jeffrey Lockwood Ph.D. on February 17, 2017 in The Infested Mind
What creatures infest the dark recesses of the mind?

The Abuse of Language by Groups Seeking Social Change

By Hank Davis on February 16, 2017 in Caveman Logic
You're driving me crazy with your over-the-top language

It’s on: Science & Religion Throw Down; Part 2

By Eric Dietrich Ph.D. on February 15, 2017 in Excellent Beauty
A prominent argument that evolution cannot explain why humans are religious is examined and found wanting.

XO in XY

By Laura Betzig Ph.D. on February 14, 2017 in The Political Animal
A small army of human geneticists is unfolding the history of human mating from our sex chromosomes.

Low-Intensity Aerobic Exercise Has Surprising Brain Benefits

By Christopher Bergland on February 14, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
There is growing evidence that low-intensity physical activity has multiple brain benefits. A new study reports that easy aerobic exercise boosts visual sensitivity and perception.

Are Flowers on Valentines Day a Big Dumb Waste of Money?

You can't eat flowers (like chocolate). You can't use them to get coffee (like a gift card). Why do we still give people flowers as gifts?

Subconscious Fear Exposure Helps Reduce Phobias, Study Finds

By Christopher Bergland on February 09, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new study reports that a technique called "backward masking" can help arachnophobes reduce their fear of spiders simply by subconsciously viewing images of spiders.

“Is Your Pet a Psychopath?”

How did deception evolve, and how do you know it's there? Learn these 4 simple, but overlooked signs.

Why Eyes are Blue

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on February 08, 2017 in The Human Beast
Our remote ancestors likely had dark eyes, whether brown or black. Blue eyes are common in northern Europe and emerged some 5,000 years ago. This suggests evolution can be fast.