Essential Reads

Playing With Politics vs. Playing Politics

By Scott G. Eberle Ph.D. on February 15, 2017 in Play in Mind
Is the game of politics play?

Purposeful Quirks Can Help You Build a Can-Do Attitude

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on February 11, 2017 in Creating in Flow
I interviewed dozens of famous writers and wrote a book about them. One of the nicest was Carolyn See. Read my interview with her now.

Manipulating Memory With the Mind's Eye

New research suggests that shifting the visual perspective of our autobiographical memories can shape and potentially restructure how we remember.

Seeking Idea Sparks

By Wilma Koutstaal Ph.D. on February 06, 2017 in Our Innovating Minds
What helps us as inspiration seekers?

More Posts on Creativity

Trivia Quiz: How Well Do You Know Psychology’s Pioneers?

When he delivered his now classic book to his publisher, which author apologized that it was a "loathsome, distended, tumefied, bloated, dropsical mass?"

Highly Creative People Have Well-Connected Brain Hemispheres

By Christopher Bergland on February 21, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
People who are highly creative have better connectivity between the left and right brain hemispheres, according to a new study by a team of international researchers.

Drug Use And Creativity

By Mark D. Griffiths Ph.D. on February 21, 2017 in In Excess
A recent systematic review of the psychological literature reviewed all studies that provided empirical data on the relationship between psychoactive substance use.

6 Tips Toward Getting Your Book Published

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on February 20, 2017 in Creating in Flow
Anyone serious about turning written work into actual books must do a lot of research into the realities of publishing before sending anything into the world. Here are 6 tips.

Creative Thinking is no Longer an Option, It's Essential

The future belongs to creative thinkers. The real currency of our time isn't money, it's ideas. You need to become an ideas generator whatever field you work in.

In Defense of Duty

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on February 19, 2017 in How To Do Life
Duty and responsibility have lost stature to autonomy and creativity--Alas.

Keep Your Eyes on the Prize

By Dean Olsher MA, MT-BC on February 15, 2017 in A Sound Mind
Meeting life’s challenges head-on allows us to not be crushed by anxiety. It is this struggle that gives our lives meaning.
Unsplash.com

Create a Morning Routine That Works For You

By Jeffrey Davis M.A. on February 15, 2017 in Tracking Wonder
Most of us have heard and read the value of a morning routine. Yet, despite our best intentions, morning routines often go awry. What to do?

Change-A-Letter Puzzles

By Marcel Danesi Ph.D. on February 13, 2017 in Brain Workout
Try these ten puzzles that will test your verbal skills, getting you to associate verbal memory with the form of words.

Recommitment Vows and Honeymoons Part 3

I know a creative, dynamic man named Ken. When he got married, he enjoyed his wedding day so much that he said to his wife, “We should do this every year!” And they have...

Recommitment Vows and Honeymoons Part 2

More and more couples are writing their own vows rather than just repeating what the minister has them say. I believe this is an important trend.
businessinsider.com

Coping With Trump Anxiety

By Jeremy Clyman Psy.D. on February 09, 2017 in Co-Parent Problems
Concrete steps for managing a new and significant stressor in American life.

Self-Actualization Through Music

By Dean Olsher MA, MT-BC on February 09, 2017 in A Sound Mind
One reason the creative arts are a powerful therapeutic resource is that they function on multiple levels. This particular song operated on at least three.

Welcoming Refugees and Immigrants Is Good for the U.S.

When the U.S. welcomes refugees regardless of religion, race, or ethnicity, we reap important social and economic rewards.

Anticipation

By Gary Klein Ph.D. on February 08, 2017 in Seeing What Others Don't
Anticipatory thinking is the way we imagine how unexpected events may affect our plans, alerting us to potential threats. But what are the dysfunctional tendencies that block it?
Cover image used with permission of author and publisher.

The Challenge of Writing and Publishing Dark Fiction

By Susan K Perry Ph.D. on February 06, 2017 in Creating in Flow
Think it's easy to write a serious book about good, evil, love, cowardice, Nazis, and a small group of people stuck on a desert island? An interview with Daniel A. Blum.

What's It Like to Write a Book?

When faced with any project, creative or otherwise, we often face doubt and fear. Learn how to keep them at bay with this one simple trick.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Remembering

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on February 05, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Dates important to us, holidays, shared memories, details, and agreements bring us opportunities to show love through remembering.

Besting Stuffiness with Science-Based Scenting

Your nose is always sniffing--make sure it's smelling the right scents!
kansascity.com

Split: Horror with a Side of Split Personality

By Jeremy Clyman Psy.D. on February 01, 2017 in Reel Therapy
Read on to learn how the split personality phenomenon can be considered at the unhealthy end of the identity spectrum.

Laura (and Emma) and Mary and I

By Susan Hooper on January 30, 2017 in Detours and Tangents
I watched “The Dick Van Dyke Show” as a child, but missed almost all of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.” And yet both Laura Petrie and Mary Richards influenced my life.

What a Century of Research Reveals About Gifted Kids

What have we learned from the findings of two major longitudinal studies of the gifted that span a century?

The Solution to Your Mind Wandering Problem

By Rob Henderson on January 30, 2017 in After Service
Are you often distracted? Some tips to stay focused.

What Makes Your Child Happy? Make It Part of Their Education

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on January 28, 2017 in Trouble in Mind
How can we enrich our children’s education to ensure they have the best options available throughout a constantly changing future?

How Sure Are You About Your Memories?

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on January 28, 2017 in Intentional Insights
Your memories may be lying to you! This article helps you be honest with yourself.
Pixabay

Balancing Optimism and Pessimism

By Diana Raab Ph.D. on January 27, 2017 in The Empowerment Diary
There are optimists and pessimists, and some are a combination of the two. This blog discusses the balancing of both, and why some people are one way or the other.

The Father of Modern Neuroscience Was an Athlete and Artist

By Christopher Bergland on January 27, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Santiago Ramón y Cajal is the father of modern neuroscience. He was also an extraordinary artist. On Jan. 28, his artworks will be shown in an American museum for the first time.

Standing With the National Endowment for the Arts

The possible elimination of the NEA and other small agencies has been reported by sources such as The Hill, Americans for the Arts and other groups over the past week.

Mike Watt’s Whole Enchilada

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on January 25, 2017 in Brick by Brick
“Where is the focus?” That is the question that Mike Watt fired back at me when I asked him what advice he would give to aspiring musicians.

Mason Swearingen and the Psychology of the Tribute Band

By Michael Friedman Ph.D. on January 23, 2017 in Brick by Brick
Beginnings, the group, which formed in 2002, has grown steadily, boasting 32 shows across the country in 2017—and that’s only through May.