Essential Reads

Cerebellum Stimulation Influences Frontal Cortex Functioning

Stimulating the cerebellum normalizes frontal cortex activity in lab rats with abnormal dopamine processing, a new study reports. These findings could have many human applications.

What's in a Name?

By Drew Boyd on March 28, 2017 in Inside the Box
A person’s facial appearance can be significantly influenced by their given name, according to new research, perhaps due to the existence of shared face-name prototypes.

The Forgotten Rural Gifted Child

What can we do to help talented students from rural backgrounds?

Real-World Neuroscience Research Promotes Human Interactions

Pioneering neuroscientists are taking their research out of the lab and into the real-world. Recent "Out of the Lab" studies illuminate the importance of face-to-face eye contact.

More Posts on Cognition

This One Skill Can Immediately Transform How You Feel

By Jennice Vilhauer Ph.D. on March 29, 2017 in Living Forward
Changing how you feel is easier than you think. Learn how to shift your attention and improve your emotional well-being.

How to Read His Mind

By Donna Barstow on March 29, 2017 in Ink Blots Cartoons
What is he really trying to tell you?

Why Do Dogs React to Cats?

Is it the sight of the cat, the sound of a cat, or the smell of a cat that excites dogs the most? The answer might surprise you.
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Divorced Over 50? Thinking of Dating? Here Are Some Tips

When dating over age 45, knowing a few tips can make a big difference.

Randomness and Intentionality

By Po Chi Wu Ph.D. on March 28, 2017 in Jacob's Staff
How can intentionality affect how our lives evolve?

In Defense of Language

It is critical that we respect our only means of making sense of our world.

The Making of Microdreams

By Michelle Carr on March 25, 2017 in Dream Factory
Tore Nielsen, author of the recent paper ‘Microdream neurophenomenology’ deconstructs the process by which Microdreams are formed.

To Understand Big Data, Try Thinking Like a Psychologist

Rich data tells us plenty about what our customers do, but next to nothing about why they are doing it.

Seriality vs Synchronicity: Kammerer vs Jung

While synchronicity theory has primarily stayed with Jungian thought, his contemporary Paul Kammerer had some very different ideas.

Why Simple Advice is Often the Best Advice

By Gregg McBride on March 25, 2017 in The Weight-ing Game
No matter how many times we replay past events or decisions in our heads, they are never going to be undone. So the sooner we swallow hard and move on, the better.

Explanation or Excuses for Stealing?

The criminal evaluates his evaluator.

Six Winning Body Language Techniques

Do you know about the secret powers of touch, or of eye contact? How about the "bubble"?

Translating Trauma: Foreign Language Interpreting in Therapy

Language is an essential part of cultural competence. Therapy with a foreign language interpreter can be awkward but help is available. Beverley Costa PhD offers tips.

Ginkgo Biloba for Mild to Moderate Dementia

If you or a loved one are thinking about trying Ginkgo for a memory problem, first review the evidence. Findings for Ginkgo in dementia are inconsistent.

Dietary Changes Reduce Alzheimer's Risk

Are you worried about developing Alzheimer's disease? Simple dietary changes can reduce your risk.
Patty Mooney [CC BY-SA 3.0]

What Is Consciousness?

What would it take to make a robot experience a dream?

Stanford Scientists Discover Surprising Cerebellum Functions

A pioneering Stanford University study has discovered a previously unknown cognitive role of specific neurons in the historically overlooked cerebellum (Latin for "little brain").

The Emerging Crisis in Critical Thinking

What can parents and teachers do to improve thinking ability?

Helpful Hacks for Conducting Research With Older Adults

By Christina M. Pierpaoli on March 18, 2017 in Eng(aging)
A psychologist-in-training discusses sources of error in geropsychologial research and clever, practical ways of managing them.

Hearing Loss Won't Kill You, or Will It?

By Katherine Bouton on March 18, 2017 in What I Hear
If you are a therapist with a patient with hearing loss, please take it seriously. Their life may depend on it.
"Lime Butterfly"/giovzaid85/CC BY 2.0

When Is Reimagining the Past a Sign of Emotional Health?

By Barb Cohen on March 17, 2017 in Mom, Am I Disabled?
For counterfactual thinking to be functionally beneficial, we need a coherent story of cause and effect that makes us an essential actor in the story.

Breaking Down the Elements of Acting

If theatre is awesome for kids, which kids? What kinds of awesome? And how? Let's break it down.

This Is What Is Wrong With the Core of Psychology

The core problem with psychology is conceptual. This blog examines the problem with the term cognitive and explains how to best think about the term.

Energizing Jung's Ideas About Synchronicity

Why spend a lifetime studying Jung's ideas about synchronicity? Professor Roderick Main is doing just that and, in this guest post, explains why.

Whole Paycheck Pauper? You’re Paying 47% More For Psychology

Eggs all in one basket? “Organic food” and its marketing is not all it’s cracked up to be. The firmest fact about organic is the marketing power behind it.

Why Language Really Matters

By John Nosta on March 16, 2017 in The Digital Self
The search of patients for drug trials is doomed by language.

Thinking Away Unwanted Thoughts

Don't bother telling yourself not to worry. It will never work. Instead, do this.

Dog Owners Are Wrong About the Health Benefits of Raw Diets

Despite dog owners' beliefs that raw animal product dog foods are healthier data suggests that they are unsafe.

Harvard Study Finds Genetic ‘Toggle Switch’ for Sociability

Researchers at Harvard Medical School have pinpointed specific neuronal circuitry and a 'toggle switch' that can turn a mouse's sociability "on" and "off" in the laboratory.

The Control Freak

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on March 15, 2017 in A Sideways View
Why do some people need to exercise constant and control of their own lives and others around them? Are they really freaks or is this need both relatively common and even adaptive?