Preschool, Nanny, Parental Care, Daycare? What’s Best?

For the most part, when parents are warm, nurturing, responsive, and engaged, their children thrive. Family life is what matters most to a young child’s development.

Adolescence: Your Parenting Work Is Not Over Yet

A parent’s job changes at a child’s adolescence. Be available while letting go. Argue. Laugh. Love the person your child really is, underneath all the identities they’re trying on.

Montessori: A Good School Choice for Smart Kids?

Montessori schools vary widely, as do individual children’s temperaments, abilities, and learning needs. Here are some criteria to consider in school decision-making.

Toddler Tantrums: Hitting, Kicking, Scratching, and Biting

Welcome your toddler’s aggression as an opportunity to fine-tune your parenting, and to teach your little one something about emotional intelligence.

A Holiday Miracle to Try at Home

At this time of year, there is magic in the air, as well as stress and worries. Here are five ways to let your heart be light.

Where Does Happiness Come from, Mommy?

Here are 7 ideas for helping your child find more smiles and laughter in their life, and experience year-round the happiness, wonder, and magic we associate with this time of year.

Helping Kids Handle Terrible Events in the News

Parents can help their kids gain resilience through times of worry if they model effective coping skills, provide reassurance, and support them in taking action.

Happily Chatty Toddlers Who Start to Stutter

Many smart toddlers develop a stuttering problem sometime between 18 months and 4 years. Usually, they grow out of it but parents can help by being patient and channeling Mr Rogers

Thank You, Michelle Obama!

In this time of change and challenge, children need help becoming smart and creative. Thank you, Michelle Obama, for living this message so effectively.

How Much Homework Is Too Much? How Can Parents Push Back?

The10-minute homework rule begins at age six, but younger children are being asked to do more. Parents can be effective advocates for the best long-term developmental outcomes.

Mindfulness Strategies for Anxious Children

Some children worry. Help your child become happier, calmer, and more productive with the Zorro Circle, the 20-Second Rule, or Gratitude at Bedtime.

Is Your School Helping or Hurting Your Child’s Literacy?

Reading is key to success. Five common teaching practices that don't work; and six ways to support kids in acquiring a love of reading that encourages learning across the lifespan.

Bedtime Checklist for Creative, Curious, Imaginative Kids

A child is happier, healthier, easier-going, and more energetic when he gets enough sleep. Here’s a 12-point checklist to ensure even active, curious kids get a good night's sleep.

Do Exceptionally Advanced Kids Do Better in Private Schools?

Start with the local public school, and see if you can make that work. If your child doesn’t thrive there—and can’t be helped to do so—then it’s time to investigate other options.

Giftedness and Social Problems

There are many reasons exceptionally capable kids can appear arrogant, perfectionistic, or impatient. Understanding and respect go a long way toward prevention and solutions.

Help Your Child or Teenager Move Toward Happy Productivity

What can you do if your child is opting out, not achieving, not engaged? Slow things down, play outside, and say thank you, and you’ll enhance the chance for happy productivity.

Parenting for Intelligence and Success

Welcoming obstacles as growth opportunities and helping kids own their learning, are two of 18 ways parents can help kids learn better and do better.

What to Do If You Think Your Child Is Gifted

Instead of asking "Is my child gifted?" or "What is his IQ?" it’s better to ask, "What does my child need in order to continue learning to the best of his ability?" "Does he have areas requiring special attention?" and "What can we do to help?"

Advocacy in Action: How to Change the World for Your Child

School doesn’t work well for every child. But by working together with others, parents can become knowledgeable about educational policies and practices, and learn to advocate effectively to get their child’s learning needs met. Here’s a 10-step action plan from Dona Matthews, PhD, and Joanne Foster, EdD.

Keep It Simple! 3 Parenting Tips for a Healthy Life Balance

As important as intellectual, social, and physical stimulation are to a young child’s developing brain and body, they’re not enough. To thrive in childhood and grow into a happily productive adult, a child needs to find a healthy balance. Dona Matthews, Ph.D., and Joanne Foster, Ed.D., suggest three ways parents can help make that happen.

Ten Secrets for a Happy Start to Preschool or Kindergarten

In the early years, from 2½ to 5, school should be a time for playful exploration, confidence-building, social development, learning about emotions and self-regulation, and proudly mastering new skills. Here are ten ways parents can help to ensure that all of this happens, and that the transition to school goes smoothly.

Getting Along With Others: Parenting for Social Intelligence

Children and teens can experience social challenges at any point during the school year. Social context—including opportunities for interaction and collaboration with others—makes an enormous difference in what and how much children learn, and how quickly that happens. Here are eight practical tips for parents to help kids build positive relationships.

How Parents Can Help Their Child Build Self-Confidence

by Dona Matthews & Joanne Foster. One of the greatest gifts a parent can give a child is self-confidence. Help her understand her unique ability profile, show him that all learning happens in small steps, support her in developing her interests, be available as needed especially in times of change, and help him welcome setbacks as learning opportunities.

Helping Kids Thrive in Middle School and High School

Early adolescence is a time of vulnerability and possibility, and whether they realize it or not, young people need their parents as much as they did as toddlers. Kids are moving toward independence, but parents still have an enormous role making sure they are safe, and increasing their chances of creating happily productive adult lives for themselves. Here are 10 ideas.

Make It a Happy Start to School: Our Top 10 Secrets

Here are some ideas for parents who want to ease their child’s return to the classroom. There are thoughts on planning ahead, paying close attention, nurturing creativity, being reassuring, making real-world connections, encouraging exploration, supporting good work habits, making time for play, finding a healthy balance, and advocating as needed.

After Divorce: Ten Principles for Parenting

Divorce can disrupt a child’s life and development, but the basic principles of good parenting hold true through the challenges. Current research shows that most children are beginning to function reasonably well within two years after their parents' divorce. Some kids even benefit, especially those whose pre-divorce family included fear, chaos, unpredictability, or abuse.

The Boy Genius and the Genius in All of Us

In The Boy Who Played with Fusion, Tom Clynes tells a fascinating story about a boy’s pursuit of a passionate interest in nuclear physics, and draws some surprising conclusions about the nature and development of genius-level intelligence. Clynes considers the roles played not only by innate ability and environmental factors, but also by temperament, culture, and politics.

Raising Happily Productive Kids in Every Kind of Family

What works to support children’s optimal development works, whether you’re raising your kids in a traditional family, in the midst of divorce, part of a gay couple, or doing anything else that doesn’t look like ‘Leave It to Beaver.’ Here are ten rules for raising happily productive kids, no matter what kind of family you’re creating.

Ten Steps Toward Parenting for Happy Productivity

Accomplishment, achievement, and recognition are good goals for our children, but being loving and happily productive on one’s own terms are better. For my children and grandchildren, what delights me more than any prizes the world might offer is a confident integrity; a radiant inner light; a life lived with love, kindness, courage, happy productivity, and appreciation.

Play! Run! Skip! 20 Ways to Keep Kids Active

Physically active kids are not only happier and healthier, but they’re also smarter. They do better on measures of academic success, well-being, self-confidence, creativity, intelligence, attention, and more. They grow into happier, healthier, more productive adults. What can you do to help ensure your child reaps all these benefits?

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