All About Caregiving

In a 2004 national survey, the AARP found that 44.4 million Americans are providing unpaid care to an adult, and the estimated annual value is $257 billion. To do so is a beautiful act of love and devotion, but also a great drain on one's physical and psychological resources.

Recent posts on Caregiving

Unselfish Singles: They Give More Time, Money, and Care

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on February 24, 2017 in Living Single
Studies based on tens of thousands of participants show that the stereotype of the self-centered single person is exactly wrong. Singles are more giving than married people.

Caregiving and Complicated Family Dynamics

By Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D. on February 12, 2017 in Social Lights
How to care for yourself amidst the chaos of caregiving.

52 Ways to Show I Love You: Giving

By Roni Beth Tower Ph.D., ABPP on February 12, 2017 in Life, Refracted
Give time, caring, and attention as well as gifts, experiences, and words.

Everything You Need to Know About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

By Toni Bernhard J.D. on February 07, 2017 in Turning Straw Into Gold
"Lighting Up a Hidden World" is the most comprehensive guide to-date on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, a little-understood illness that can have a devastating effect on people’s lives.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

Teaching the Early Adolescent About Freedom

Adolescence are concerned with getting freedom to grow -- freedom from from old restraints and freedom for new opportunity. Parents need to speak to both concerns.
Sarah Baker/Flickr/CC by 2.0

Prisoners Working With the Dying

How prisoners can learn compassion.

Trauma and First Responders: When the Helpers Need Help

It’s not easy to admit you’re struggling emotionally. It’s even harder when you’re one who usually comes to the rescue of others.

Do Scars Always Make Us Stronger?

By Erin Wood on January 18, 2017 in Marked
How a cliché causes us to miss important discoveries.
Kristin A. Meekhof

Breaking Bad: Things to Consider When Delivering Bad News

Why Empathy Matters In Breaking Bad News

Ghosts of Winters Past

By Susan Hooper on December 30, 2016 in Detours and Tangents
Long winter nights and holiday traditions can combine to summon vivid, bittersweet memories of loved ones we have lost.
Carl Pickhardt Ph.D.

The Invisible Efforts of Parenting

Celebrate your investment. Your teenager won't.

Giving Love and Support to Others Could Help You Live Longer

By Christopher Bergland on December 24, 2016 in The Athlete's Way
Making an effort to take care of people within—and beyond—your immediate family is associated with longer life expectancy for the caregiver, according to a new international study.

Last Minute Holiday Toys that Break the Gender Box

By Karlyn Crowley Ph.D. on December 21, 2016 in Woman Power
Don't let final toy shopping countdown get you down, try these toys that free your child's development.

Dining with Disability

"Why does Grandma talk funny?", your daughter asks at the holiday dinner.

Love as Attachment

Compulsive care-seekers, compulsive caregivers and avoidant individuals typically do not have a loving response that matches that of their partners.

Physical Punishment and Violence

To paraphrase Abe Lincoln, if hitting a child is not wrong, then nothing is wrong. If we truly want to decrease violence in our society, not hitting our children is a good place.

Helping the Terminally Ill

People with a terminal illness face the most lonely and fearful time of their lives. A Palliative Care team provides comfort and optimizes quality of life during this trying time.

Hospital Madness & Farewell Dad

By Eliezer Sobel on November 28, 2016 in The 99th Monkey
We had discovered a little-known secret about most hospitals and doctors: they will essentially do anything you ask, relieving them of the burden of having to make decisions.

Co-Parenting as Addiction Prevention

By Edward Kruk Ph.D. on November 22, 2016 in Co-Parenting After Divorce
Too many parents have lost and need help to retrieve their primary connection with their children.

When the Fighting Stops

Irrelationship is a jointly created state of insanity made visible in the mutual acting-out ‎of the anxiety of being vulnerable, intimate, empathetic and invested in one another.

Applying The Scientific Method To Charity

By Gleb Tsipursky Ph.D. on November 15, 2016 in Intentional Insights
Want to make sure your generous gifts make a real difference? Here are some ways to do so!
lawprier/Flickr, CC by 2.0

The Healing Power of Laughter in Death and Grief

If humor is a part of living, than why should it not be a part of dying?

Our Early Emotional Life

…we examined our earliest feelings and how they work. This month we take a brief look at some of the conceptual issues and questions surrounding our early emotional life.

If Single People Ruled, Here’s What Would Change

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on October 28, 2016 in Living Single
If single people wrote the laws and policies of the land, we would see greater inclusiveness and fewer people left vulnerable.

The Role of the Parent, Caregiver, and Teacher

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on October 27, 2016 in How To Do Life
An interview with Alison Gopnik.

We Need a New Word for Stepparents

By Wendy Paris on October 25, 2016 in Splitopia
The fact that a stepparent is not a legal relationship highlights the role of strong emotional bonds within a blended family structure. Three tips for building good bonds.

The Crisis of the Ailing Toxic Mother: Caretake or Run?

By Peg Streep on October 24, 2016 in Tech Support
Much has been written about the "Sandwich" generation-but the daughter of an unloving or abusive mother faces a different, more complicated choice without easy answers...
By Nogas1974 (Own work), via Wikimedia Commons This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

Biology Determines Every Thought, Feeling, and Behavior

By John A. Johnson Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Cui Bono
Psychologists say behavior results from the interaction of biology and environment, yet argue about their relative importance. Read why the importance of biology is always 100%.

But I Didn't Mean to Let You Down!

By Katherine Hawley Ph.D. on October 20, 2016 in Trust
When we are over-committed, at work or at home, we can become untrustworthy despite our best intentions.

Animal Altruism?

By Kristin Brethel-Haurwitz, Ph.D. and Abigail Marsh, Ph.D. on October 18, 2016 in For Goodness’ Sake
Why do humpback whales go out of their way to save the lives of seals? In this post, we discuss what could motivate such incredible behavior.